Wholesale Indoor Flowering Plant Seasonal Availability

Wholesale Indoor Flowering Plant Seasonal Availability

ITEM SIZE JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JULY AUG SEPT OCT NOV DEC
AMARYLLIS 6″ X X X
AMARYLLIS 10″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
ANTHURIUM 4″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
ANTHURIUM 6″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
ALPHELANDRA 6″ X X X
AZALEA 4.5″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
AZALEA 6″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
BABY TEARS 4″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
BOSTON FERN HB 10″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
BULB ASSORTED PACK 4″ X X X X X
BULB ASSORTED PACK 6″ X X X X X
BULB GARDEN 6″ X X X X
BULB GARDEN 7″ X X X X
BULB GARDEN 8″ X X X X
BULB GARDEN 10″ X X X X
BULB GARDEN TERRACOTTA 12″ X X X X X
BULB GARDEN TERRACOTTA 16″ X X X X X
CALADIUM 6″ X X X X
CALANDIVA 2.5″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
CALANDIVA 4″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
CALANDIVA 4.5″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
CALANDIVA 6″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
CALLA LILY 4.5″ X X X X X X X X
CALLA LILY 6″ X X X X X X X X
CAMPANULA BELL 4″ X X X X
CAMPANULA WONDER 2.5″ X X X X X X X
CAMPANULA WONDER 4″ X X X X X X X X X
CAMPANULA WONDER 6″ X X X X X X X X X
CINERARIA 6″ X X X X
CITROSA 6″ X X X
CYCLAMEN 4.5″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
CYCLAMEN 6″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
CYCLAMEN 8″ X X X X X X
CYCLAMEN RUFFELED 6″ X X X X X X
CYPRESS 4″ X X
CYPRESS 6″ X X
DAFFODIL 4″ X X X X
DAFFODIL 6″ X X X X
DAFFODIL 7″ X X X X
DAFFODIL PAN 8″ X X X X
DAFFODIL PAN 10″ X X X X
DAHLIA 4″ X X
DIPLADENIA 4″ X X X
EASTER LILY 5 BLM 6″ X X
EASTER LILY 7+ BLM 6″ X X
EASTER LILY 8″ X X
EASTER LILY 10″ X X
ECHEVERIA 6″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
EXACUM 4.5′ X X X X
EXACUM 6″ X X X X X X X
FERN-FROSTY 4″ X X
FERNS-TABLE 4″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
FLEURETTE 5″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
GERBERA DAISY 4.5″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
GERBERA DAISY 6″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
GOLDFISH HB 6.5″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
GOLDFISH HB 8″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
HEATHER CALLUNA 4″ X X X
HEATHER ERICA 4″ X X X X X
HENS AND CHICKS 4″ X X X X X
HERBS 4″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
HERBS 6″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
HIBISCUS 6″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
HYACINTH 4″ X X X X X
HYACINTH 6″ X X X X X
HYACINTH 7″ X X X X X
HYACINTH 8″ X X X X X
HYACINTH 10′ X X X X X
HYDRANGEA 4.5″ X X X X X
HYDRANGEA 6″ X X X
HYDRANGEA 8″ X X X X X
HYDRANGEA 10″ X X X
IRIS 4″ X X X X
IVY ASSORTED 3″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
IVY ASSORTED 4″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
IVY ASSORTED 6″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
IVY ASSORTED TOPIARIES 6″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
IVY GLOBE TOPIARY 6″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
IVY HEART TOPIARY 6″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
IVY HOOP 6″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
IVY STANDARD BALL 6″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
IVY TOWER 6″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
IVY HOOP 7″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
IVY DOUBLE BALL TOPIARY 8″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
IVY HB 8″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
IVY-STD BALL TOPIARY 8″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
IVY HB 10″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
IVY MONTGOMERY HB 10″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
IVY STANDARD BALL TOPIARY 12″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
JASMINE HOOP 6″ X X X X X
JERUSALEM CHERRY 6″ X X
KALANCHOE 2.5″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
KALANCHOE 4″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
KALANCHOE 4.5′ X X X X X X X X X X X X
KALANCHOE 6″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
LAVENDER 4.5″ X X
LAVENDER 6″ X X
LILY PIXIE 6″ X X X X
MARGUERITE DAISY TREE 10″ X X
MARTHA WASHINGTON 4.5″ X X X X
MARTHA WASHINGTON 6″ X X X X
MARTHA WASHINGTON HB 10″ X X X X
MUM 4.5″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
MUM EASTER EGG 6″ X X
MUM FALL FESTIVAL 6″ X X
MUM 6″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
MUM PELEE 6″ X X X X
MUMSETTIA 7″ X X
MUSCARI 4″ X X X
ORCHID SINGLE SPIKE 2.5″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
ORCHID DOUBLE SPIKE 4.75″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
ORCHID SINGLE SPIKE 4.75″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
ORCHID DOUBLE SPIKE 5″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
ORCHID SINGLE SPIKE 5″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
ORCHID DOUBLE SPIKE 6″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
ORCHID SINGLE SPIKE 6″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
ORNAMENTAL PEPPER 4″ X X X
ORNAMENTAL PEPPER 6″ X X X
OXALIS GREEN 4″ X X
OXALIS RED 4″ X X
OXALIS GREEN 6″ X X
OXALIS RED 6″ X X
PANSY 4″ X X X X
PAPERWHITES 5″ X X X X X X
PAPERWHITES 6″ X X X X X X
PAPERWHITES 8″ X X X X X X
PAPERWHITES 10″ X X X X X X
POINSETTIA 4.5″ X X
POINSETTIA 6″ X X
POINSETTIA 8″ X X
POINSETTIA (3PL) 10″ X X
POINSETTIA HB 10″ X X
POINSETTIA TREE 7.5″ X X
POINSETTIA TREE 10″ X X
POINSETTIA WINTER ROSE 4″ X X
POINSETTIA WINTER ROSE 6″ X X
POLKA DOT 4″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
POTHOS HB 10″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
PRIMULA ACAULIS 4″ X X X X
PRIMULA MALECOIDES 4″ X X X
PRIMULA OBCONICA 4″ X X X
PRIMULA OBCONICA 6″ X X X
PUSSY WILLOW 6″ X X X X
VARIGATED JAPANESE WILLOW 6″ X X X
RANUNCULUS 4″ X X X X
RIEGER BEGONIA 4.5″ X X X X X X X X X X X
RIEGER BEGONIA 6″ X X X X X X X X X X X
REIGER BEGONIA HB 10″ X X X
REIGER BEGONIA PREMIUM 6″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
ROSE-MINI 4.5″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
ROSE-MINI 6″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
ROSE-MINI SUNBLAZE 4.5″ X X X X
ROSE-MINI SUNBLAZE 6″ X X X X
RUDBECKIA 6″ X X
SOMONA 2.5″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
SOMONA 4″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
SOMONA 6″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
SPATHIPHYLLUM 4.5″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
SPATHIPHYLLUM 6″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
SPIDER HANGING BASKET 10″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
SUNFLOWER 6″ X X X X X X
TROPICALS ASSORTED 3″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
TROPICALS ASSORTED 4″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
TROPICALS ASSORTED 6″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
TROPICALS ASSORTED HB 4″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
TROPICALS ASSORTED HB 6.5″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
TROPICALS ASSORTED HB 8″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
TROPICALS ASSORTED HB 10″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
TULIP 4″ X X X X X
TULIP 6″ X X X X X
TULIP 7″ X X X X X
TULIP 8″ X X X X X
TULIP 10″ X X X X X
VIOLET 2.5″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
VIOLET 4″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
VIOLET 6″ X X X X X X X X X X X X
ZYGOCACTUS 4″ X X X
ZYGOCACTUS 6″ X X X
ZYGOCACTUS HB 6″ X X X
ZYGOCACTUS PAN 8″ X X X
ZYGOCACTUS HB 8″ X X X
ZYGOCACTUS HB 10″ X X X

Dieffenbachia Care

Dieffenbachia Sterling

Dieffenbachia Care Instructions

Many people ask us for the proper care of the Dieffenbachia plant- a member of the family Araceae. By following these instructions, you should have no problem keeping your Dieffenbachia not only surviving, but thriving for years to come. The Dieffenbachia are some of the most popular indoor plants used in homes, offices and interior landscapes due to their attractive appearance and interesting patterns of color on their leaves. Dieffenbachia are on NASA’s list of clean air plants because they help filter the air of harmful chemicals. It is recommended to use one plant per 100 square feet of living space to help filter chemicals such as formaldehyde and benzene from the air. Dieffenbachia are also referred to as the Dumb Cane.

Varieties

Dieffenbachia comes in many varieties and a range of patterns. They are available as a bush and sometimes grown as a cane. Generally providing a thick and dense form, Dieffenbachia are available in 4, 6, 8, 10, 12,14 and 17in pot sizes. The heights will vary depending on what shape that plant was groomed into. Dieffenbachia provide a great alternative to a standard Janet Craig or Corn Plant in an interior or office environment where the lighting is suitable. Popular varieties include Camille, Tropic Snow, Panther, Camouflage, Compacta and Sterling – although there are dozens of others.

Lighting Requirements

Dieffenbachia do best in well-lit locations such as a window sill that has an Eastern exposure. Bright but indirect sunlight is optimal. Be careful not to put your Dieffenbachia in full sun because in many cases the plant will burn and the leaves will be damaged in a similar way that people get sunburn. If you have less than optimal lighting available, do not worry. Dieffenbachia has an excellent track record with tolerating medium light locations. In most cases, artificial lighting such as in a windowless office is not ideal for this plant. Some varieties tend to do better than others in low light. From our experience Dieffenbachia are an excellent choice for medium to bright light situations.

Temperature Requirements

The Dieffenbachia is a great interior plant because it prefers the same temperatures that many homes are kept at on a daily basis. Night time temperatures in the lower 60’s and day time temperatures in the 70’s are ideal. Keep in mind that although your home or office are kept at these average temperatures, other factors may play a part in your plant being too hot or cold. Make sure that your Dieffenbachia is not directly affected by a heating or air conditioner vent. The direct cold or hot air will surely damage your plant. You also want to keep an eye on the window if you place your plant in one. On very cold days, the glass will transfer the cold – and if the leaves from your Dieffenbachia are pressed against the glass, they will become damaged. It is never a good idea to have your Dieffenbachia up against any window or wall. You will also want to avoid any drafts in colder climates. A cold gust of wind from being placed near a door or window that opens could also damage your plant.

Watering Dieffenbachia

The most important thing to keep in mind when watering Dieffenbachia are that you want to avoid creating a situation that promotes root rot. In our homes and offices, we keep them in a light, well-draining soil. They prefer to be kept on the moist, but not so moist that it damages the plant. There is not specific amount or frequency of water that we can suggest because the lighting, temperature and evaporation rates differ in every home. You will need to develop a feel for the proper amount of water. Try to water at an even amount of moisture, not letting your plant get soaking wet and then allowing it to completely dry out. Do not let water accumulate in the crown or cups that the leaves. Moderation is key. Any planter that allows for evaporation, air flow and water drainage works well. Once you develop the “feel” for watering, you will be able to judge when to water by picking up the plant. The heavier the plant feels, the more moisture there is in the growing medium. If the plant is too large to lift, a water meter is well worth the investment.

Are Your Plants Leaf Tips Turning Brown?

A common problem with Dieffenbachia and almost all indoor houseplants is what we call “tipping” or simply the tips of the leaves drying out and turning brown. This can be caused by a number of factors including over-watering, chemical burn from too much fertilizer, Root rot and dry stagnant air. Probably the most common reason your plant is tipping could be in the tap water. Tap water contains salts, chlorine, minerals and fluoride – all of which can build up in the soil of your plant causing the tips of the leaves to burn and turn brown. One way you can reduce this is to use a water filtration system. If you do not have a filtration system available, leaving he water in an open container overnight before using can help relieve some of the chlorine.

Fertilizing Dieffenbachia

Do house plant fertilizers work? Definitely. Anitas, like every other living thing need a source of energy. The plants take in their nutrients from the water and potting medium they are planted in. That medium only holds so much, and when the nutrients are depleted, fertilizer is the only source left. People who grow house plants without repotting and fertilizing regularly are essentially starving the plants and holding them back from their full potential. There are many different fertilizers on the market and they come in many forms. There are water soluble fertilizers, ready to use liquid, liquid concentrate, fertilizer spikes, time release granules and many others. Which fertilizer works best? That is up for you to decide. We prefer a ready to use liquid simply for the convenience of use. We also dilute the fertilizer and use every time we water so there is a constant stream of nutrients being fed to the plants.

Are Dieffenbachia Poisonous to pets and humans?

The Dieffenbachia plant contains needle-shaped calcium oxalate crystals called raphides. Chewing, biting or ingesting the plant can cause a variety of unpleasant symptoms such as redness or swelling, a burning sensation, numbing, oral irritation and excessive drooling. It is suggested that households with children and pets should avoid this plant.

Do you have a question about Dieffenbachia or any other plant that was not answered here? Please feel free to contact us at 201-794-4747 and speak with one of our knowledgeable staff members. We would be happy to help.

We are New Jersey’s and NYC’s premier source for wholesale tropical plants and cut flowers. We specialize in orders for hard to find plants and cut flowers.

Wholesale Mulch and Soils

Wholesale Mulch

Metropolitan Wholesale Provides Wholesale Mulch and Soils

 

Metropolitan Wholesale sells bagged Soils, Wholesale Mulch and Topsoil in the New Jersey and New York City Area.

Take a look at some of our pricing for 2014:

8qt Miracle Gro Potting Soil $6.50 10 Bags + $5.75/Bag
8qt Miracle Gro Cactus Mix $4.95 10Bags + $4.45/Bag
8qt Miracle Gro Orchid Mix $4.95 10Bags + $4.45/Bag
8qt Miracle Gro African Violet $4.95 10Bags + $4.45/Bag
16qt Miracle Gro Potting Soil $9.50 10 Bags + $8.55/Bag
1cf Miracle Gro Potting Soil $11.50 10 Bags + $10.35/Bag
2cf Miracle Gro Potting Soil $18.50 10 Bags + $16.75/Bag
1cf Topsoil W/ Carry Handle $6.50 10 Bags + $5.85/Bag
40Lb LI Topsoil $2.20 60 Bags + $1.70/Bag
Hardwood Mulch 2cf Bags
Black $3.65 70 Bags+ $3.25/Bag
Red $3.65 70 Bags+ $3.25/Bag
Brown $3.65 70 Bags+ $3.25/Bag
Organic $3.65 70 Bags+ $3.25/Bag
2cf Pine Bark Nuggets $8.50 64 Bags + $7.25/Bag
2cf Pine Bark Mini Nuggets $8.50 64 Bags + $7.25/Bag
Chickity Doo Doo $12.50

This is just a sample of what we carry. We also have Wholesale Peat Moss, Spaghnam Moss, Spanish Moss, Sheet Moss, Manure, Fertilizers, Bales of Hay, Shredded Hay… Just let us know what you are looking for. There are no minimum purchases. Feel free to contact us anytime at 20-794-4747

Wall Street Journal Article: Metropolitan Wholesale

The Following Article Appeared In The Wall Street Journal on Saturday 5/10/14:

Picking Among Low-End Flowers in Advance of Mother’s Day

Metro Money: Anne Kadet Says Some New Yorkers Will Be Tempted by the Bodega Bouquet

May 9, 2014 9:59 p.m. ET

Owner Nick Valenti at Metropolitan Wholesale in Saddle Brook, N.J.                Kevin Hagen for The Wall Street Journal

It’s Mother’s Day weekend, and all the good boys and girls will be buying fancy arrangements of roses, peonies and tulips from the city’s fancy florists. You can spend hundreds of dollars, if you like, on pink hyacinths. But more than a few New Yorkers will be tempted by a cheaper alternative—the bodega bouquet.

Yes, nothing says “I’m busy but I love you” like a $12 bunch of roses from the green grocer’s sidewalk stand. It’s the floral equivalent of cake from a mix. And does mom even have to know? Not if you’re clever with your flower choices. But more on that later.

The more interesting question, for those of us who rely on the easy availability of these cheap bouquets for dinner parties, birthdays and “I’m sorry I snubbed your cat” occasions, is where do these flowers come from? Every green grocer in town seemingly carries the same stock of $5 neon daisies, $6 carnations and, come May, $8 tulip bouquets.

Assorted tulips originating from Colombia are readied.                Kevin Hagen for The Wall Street Journal

Forget the city’s wholesale flower district—that’s the high end. Grocery stores have their own network of suppliers. Among them is Metropolitan Wholesale, an outfit operating out of a low-slung industrial park in Saddle Brook, N.J. Owner Nick Valenti supplies about 3,000 shops ranging from florists and event planners to nearly 100 bodegas in Manhattan and the Bronx.

The business is surprisingly high tech. Mr. Valenti maintains a slick website that clients use to place orders. Bodegas prefer the cheaper posies, he said on a recent morning, scrolling through the options on his site. He offers several dozen varieties of tulip, for example, including the soft pink “Rosario,” which wholesales for 82 cents a stem. But bodegas favor the “multi-color assortment”—a grab-bag carton of 350 tulips in mystery shades. “They buy cheap and in high quantities,” he said.

Mr. Valenti paid 42 cents a stem for the latest shipment of assorted color tulips from Holland; he sells them to bodegas for 46 cents. It’s a slim margin, but he’ll sell a quarter-million flowers in the week before Mother’s Day.

Most of his buds come through the big flower auction in Holland. But roses are his favorite, and these he buys directly from a dozen small farms in Ecuador. “My job is to know what farms are good at what colors,” he says. He calls the farms via Skype, placing orders in broken Spanish. Hardy flowers like carnations, which can survive a three-day journey, are flown to Miami on cargo planes and trucked up the Interstate for delivery to his warehouse. Delicate varieties requiring speedy delivery are flown directly to JFK and trucked straight to the bodegas under the cover of night.

I was hoping he’d tell me that bodegas carry the same flowers as the florists. Then I could tell myself I’m not a cheapskate, just a clever shopper. Alas, that’s not so. Flowers are sorted and priced by grade, and bodegas seldom carry the prime specimens.

The typical cymbidium orchid stem sold at the green grocer, for instance, carries six blooms and wholesales for $7. The high-end version, meanwhile, might carry 18 flowers and wholesale for $22. The classic bodega carnation, known as a “short,” has a two-inch bloom and a thin, 30-centimeter stem, while the “select” grade offers a three-inch head and a 50-centimeter stalk. And while the green grocer offers loads of white and blue hydrangeas from Colombia—those cloudlike flowers that look like sheep on a stem—only the florist offers the beautifully fringed, pink blush varieties grown in Holland.

Bodegas, however, do have the market cornered on those orange and blue neon daisies. The screaming blooms are dyed by Ecuadorian farm hands who soak the stems in colored water. “It looks atrocious to me,” says Mr. Valenti, “but people like them.”

So can you fool mom with a cheap bouquet? Yes, if you’re lucky enough to shop with a florist who teaches a workshop in bodega flower arranging. Last week, I hit the streets with Beth Was Horta, a freelance florist who jets around the world creating arrangements for big events. She teaches at FlowerSchool New York, a floral arts school on West 14th Street catering to both professionals and flower-crazed enthusiasts.

She’s wary of bodega flowers. Grocery owners have no place to chill their posies overnight, shortening their lifespan. And to avoid waste, some sell flowers past their prime. If flowers were monsters, bodega posies would be the walking dead.

Ms. Was Horta and I started at a Korean snack shop in the Village fronted by the usual buckets jammed with carnations and bright orange gerberas. She pointed out a sorry-looking bouquet of roses. The buds were oddly pointy. “They’ve peeled off the petals that have started to wilt,” she says. The remaining petals are veined—another sign of age. “And feel this!” she says, squeezing the base of a bud. It was soft and spongy, a symptom of dehydration.

Ms. Was Horta dismissed the store’s mixed arrangements—those riotous combos of red roses, sunflowers and baby’s breath found only at the bodega. Not only do they look like the work of a crazy person, they’re often composed of flowers past their prime.

But looking further, she found plenty of floral fodder for an elegant Mother’s Day arrangement. Her strategy: combining four or five flower varieties in the same color family. “Keep it mono and you’re taking out the guesswork,” she says.

She starts with the $10 lilacs and $8 purple tulips. Flowers in season are usually the best deal at the stand. Next, she selects a bouquet of spray carnations. “Carnations can be a good foundation or serve as filler,” she says. She adds two $6 bunches of striped alstroemeria—a delicate looking lily that’s surprisingly hardy. Finally, she grabs a bunch of deep green ruscus leaves; foliage adds polish.

Back at the flower school, she gives every stem a fresh cut, hammering the woody stems of the lilacs to split them open. She snips off stray branches and leaves that would rot under the water line.

It takes about 45 minutes to dissemble, trim and arrange all nine bouquets in a $2 glass vase. But the result looks like something you’d see in the lobby of the Plaza Hotel. This would really wow mom.

Back home, the lovely tulips and lilacs last about two days. But what did I expect? The cheap carnations, of course, will never, ever die.

Perfect for regifting on Father’s Day!

Cordyline Care

Cordyline Red Sister

Cordyline Care Instructions

 

This article will explain in-depth Cordyline care instructions. By following this guideline, you should have no problem keeping your plant not only surviving, but thriving for years to come. The Cordyline is quite a versatile plant used in homes, offices and interior landscapes due to their easy care amazing variety of colors that are available. The Cordyline is also more commonly known as the Ti Plant and it’s scientific name is from the family Asparagaceae. They are native to the Pacific Ocean region – including Asia, Hawaii and Australia, but can now be found commonly throughout the world. Popular in Florida landscapes, Cordyline are also used as a houseplant in colder climates and could reach up to 15′ in height.

Varieties and Sizes

Cordyline can be found in 4, 6, 8, 10, 14 and 17″ pots. Most Cordyline are grown in a bush form but can also be found grown into a cane shape as well. Larger sizes are available for special orders. There are many varieties of Cordyline that come in a vast array of colors ranging from a dark green to a hot pink foliage. They also come in variegated with white stripes running through the red, green or pink foliage. Some of the most popular and readily available varieties of Cordyline include Glauca, Florica, Red Sister, Hot Pepper, Xerox, Black Magic, Exotica, Maria and Auntie Lou. All varieties can be grown outdoors in warmer climates when there is no chance of frost. They are also perennial in USDA hardiness zones 10B-11.

Lighting Requirements

Cordyline do best in locations with bright, filtered light such as a window sill that has an Eastern exposure when grown indoors. When grown outdoors, Glauca prefer a location that gets partial sun and partial shade. If you have less than optimal lighting available, try the Cordyline Glauca. Glauca is a variety of Cordyline that tends to survive very well in poor lighting conditions. From our experience Red Sister, Hot Pepper and Xerox are an excellent choice for a room or office with direct natural sunlight.

Temperature Requirements

The Cordyline is a great house or office plant because it prefers the same temperatures that many living situations are kept at on a daily basis. Night time temperatures in the lower 60’s and day time temperatures in the 70’s are ideal. Keep in mind that although your home or office are kept at these average temperatures, other factors may play a part in your plant being too hot or cold. Make sure that your plant is not directly affected by a heating or air conditioner vent. The direct cold or hot air will surely damage your plant. You also want to keep an eye on the window if you place your plant in one. On very cold days, the glass will transfer the cold – and if the leaves from your Cordyline are pressed against the glass, they will become damaged. It is never a good idea to have your plant up against any window or wall. You will also want to avoid any drafts in colder climates. A cold gust of wind from being placed near a door or window that opens could also damage your plant.

Watering Cordyline

The most important thing to keep in mind when watering Cordyline (as with almost any plant) are that you want to avoid creating a situation that promotes root rot. In our homes and offices, we keep them in a light, well-draining soil. They prefer to be kept on the moist side, but are very drought tolerant. Cordyline require an average amount of humidity and will benefit from the occasional misting. There is not specific amount or frequency of water that we can suggest because the lighting, temperature and evaporation rates differ in every home and office – but on average you probably should not be watering your plant more than 4 times per month. The quantity of water that you give the plant depends on the pot size and how dry/moist the soil is. You will need to develop a feel for the proper amount of water. Try to water at an even amount of moisture, not letting your plant get soaking wet and then allowing it to dry out between watering. Do not let water accumulate in the crown or cups that the leaves. Moderation is key. Any planter that allows for evaporation, air flow and water drainage works well. Once you develop the “feel” for watering, you will be able to judge when to water by picking up the plant. The heavier the plant feels, the more moisture there is in the growing medium. If the plant is too large to lift, a water meter is well worth the investment.

Are Your Plants Leaf Tips Turning Brown?

A common problem with Cordyline and almost all indoor houseplants is what we call “tipping” or simply the tips of the leaves drying out and turning brown. This can be caused by a number of factors including over-watering, chemical burn from too much fertilizer, Root rot and dry stagnant air. Probably the most common reason your plant is tipping could be in the tap water. Tap water contains salts, chlorine, minerals and fluoride – all of which can build up in the soil of your plant causing the tips of the leaves to burn and turn brown. One way you can reduce this is to use a water filtration system. If you do not have a filtration system available, leaving he water in an open container overnight before using can help relieve some of the chlorine.

Fertilizing Cordyline

Do house plant fertilizers work? Definitely. Cordylines, like every other living thing need a source of energy. The plants take in their nutrients from the light, water and potting medium they are planted in. That medium only holds so much, and when the nutrients are depleted, fertilizer is the only source left. People who grow house plants without repotting and fertilizing regularly are essentially starving the plants and holding them back from their full potential. There are many different fertilizers on the market and they come in many forms. There are water soluble fertilizers, ready to use liquid, liquid concentrate, fertilizer spikes, time release granules and many others. Which fertilizer works best? That is up for you to decide. We prefer a ready to use liquid simply for the convenience of use. We also dilute the fertilizer and use every time we water so there is a constant stream of nutrients being fed to the plants.

Cordyline Disease and Insects

Cordyline are susceptible to common insect infestation when grown indoors. The most common problems that can occur are spider mites, mealy bugs and scale. All of these issues can be resolved quite easily if spotted early and treated properly. In most cases, a simple treatment of insecticidal soap or a solution of rubbing alcohol and water will do the trick. If you are having problems with your plant and not sure of the right solution, contact us and we will be happy to provide the best product for your issue.

Do you have a question about Cordyline or any other plant that was not answered here? Please feel free to contact us at 201-794-4747 and speak with one of our knowledgeable staff members. We would be happy to help.

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